Scientific sources

Our trauma-sensitive, mindfulness-based yoga is backed by evidence-based research. It has been demonstrated that yoga supports both physical health and emotional well-being. The following are some of the latest research studies that support our methodology and demonstrate the healing potential of yoga.


Reduces Stress

Research studies have clearly demonstrated a strong reduction in perceived stress levels for those who participate regularly in yoga classes. Yoga increases the parasympathetic nervous response (“rest and digest”) and decreases the sympathetic nervous system (“fight, flight or freeze”) activity. Return to top

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The more yoga classes individuals attended in a prison yoga program, the greater decreases in perceived stress

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Participants in yoga had less stress and less substance abuse than the control group.

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A yoga program effectively reduced perceived distress and improved physiological outcomes

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A three-month yoga program reduced perceived stress levels

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Adolescents in school-based yoga had greater ability to cope with stress after 10 weeks

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Yoga demonstrated positive psychological or physiological outcomes related to stress.

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A yoga program offered in seven prisons reduced stress levels

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Increases Emotional and Self-Awareness

Yoga and meditation help us to notice feelings, like pain or anxiety, so that we can recognize the discomfort with presence and compassion. With greater self-awareness, we have general better understanding of ourselves and are empowered to make changes that support our strengths. Return to top

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An evaluation of a yoga program for preventing adolescent substance use risk factors found that yoga improved their emotional self-control

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Skills and self-awareness learned through yoga can help change multiple psychological, neural, physiological and behavioral processes implicated in addiction and relapse

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Women who participated in a yoga program in two correctional facilities reported significantly decreased depression and improved self-awareness

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A trauma-sensitive yoga program reduced PTSD symptoms by helping people understand physical and sensory experiences and increasing self and emotional awareness

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Analysis of case studies of a yoga program for youth overcoming trauma observed increases in the participants self-awareness


Reduces Anxiety and Depression

Feeling anxious or depressed is a common experience. The ability of yoga to decrease anxiety and depression for participants is well-documented. Our yoga classes provide tools of physical postures as well as mental practices that can help alleviate symptoms of anxiety or depression. Return to top

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A yoga program for people with substance abuse disorders reduced depression and anxiety

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Women in a prison yoga program experienced fewer symptoms of depression and anxiety

Yoga reduced depression and increased quality of life for men overcoming addiction

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Yoga for youth in at-risk environments reduced anxiety, depression and psychological distress

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Yoga in a rehab hospital improved participant’s anxiety and self-compassion

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Increases Impulse Control

Controlling an impulse, whether it is for drug use or anger, requires a level of self-awareness and respect for one’s self. Multiple studies have documented the effect of yoga on increasing impulse control. Through our methodology, participants begin to learn tools to aid in their own decision-making. Return to top

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An 8-week mindfulness program found participants had decreased cravings for substances and increased awareness

A mindfulness-based relapse prevention program found fewer drug use days and legal/medical problems compared to the control group

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A yoga intervention offered at a juvenile justice center increased participant's self-control and decreased perceived stress


Improves Self-Regulation

Self-regulation is our ability to self-soothe, whether it is emotionally, behaviorally or cognitively. It is an important skill to develop as it influences one’s ability to calm themselves down or cheer themselves up. Yoga has been found to increase our capacity to self-regulate. Return to top

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Mindfulness interventions in correctional facilities improved self-regulation

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A yoga program significantly improved emotional well-being and less anti-social behavior at correctional facilities

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Yoga improved measures related to self-regulation, including hostility and mood disturbances

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Students reported improvements in attention, self-esteem and ability to calm themselves down

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Yoga participants at a prison all reported increases in self-efficacy and decreases in self-reported anger

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Mindfulness-based meditation improved maladaptive, response-focused strategies

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Yoga in a school-based context may be an effective way to help students develop self-regulation

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Supports Recovery From Trauma

Overcoming a traumatic experiences may be a life-long recovery process. Individuals with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, or symptoms related to trauma, often experience dissociation with their bodies and are perpetually in a state of “fight, flight, freeze.” Yoga has been found to help restore connection to the body and to return a person’s nervous system to a homeostatic state of “rest and digest.” Return to top

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A yoga program offered to women with PTSD found significantly reduced PTSD symptomology

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Mindfulness instruction may mitigate the negative effects of stress and trauma related to adverse childhood experiences and help improve well-being in adulthood

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A study of a yoga program for women with PTSD found that yoga may improve PTSD symptomology by increasing psychological flexibility

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Women who participated in a trauma-sensitive yoga program reported improved connection with their bodies, a sense of ownership, and more control over thoughts, emotions and feelings

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Seven out of 8 studies reviewed on yoga and mindfulness programs for youth who had been maltreated in order to build inner resilience found partial positive outcomes associated with each intervention


Improves Chronic Pain

Chronic pain can can have a cataclysmic effect on a person going through high levels of stress or working through recovery. Yoga has been found to reduce both the perception of pain and it’s interference in daily life, thereby improving a person’s sense of well-being. Return to top

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Mindfulness-based interventions have been found to lower the perception of pain, increase mobility, and improve functioning & wellbeing

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A study of a weekly yoga program found that participants reframed what it meant to live with chronic pain

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Yoga may be more effective than usual care for reducing pain and pain medication use for chronic back pain